Achoo…F-F-F Flu! The Flu Vaccine and Pregnancy

Break out the tissues, start brewing the tea, and swallow that Echinacea, because winter is coming! No, this is not an episode of “Game of Thrones,” but a chill is in the air. When the temperatures drop, anxiety over the flu rises, as does our consumption of vitamin C. Hand washing becomes an obsession, and coughing or sneezing without covering one’s face is the biggest faux pas. Despite what may feel like a lot of hype, the flu is the real deal, especially for women who are pregnant.

Because the flu can be way more than a one-day couch-lounging event, any method to prevent catching it is of the utmost importance. In addition to good hand washing and sanitary practices, the flu vaccine can significantly reduce one’s chance of getting the flu. Given changes in the immune system and respiratory system, pregnant women are at increased risk for not only getting the flu but also getting the flu with a vengeance.

Along with the muscle aches, runny nose, and headaches, pregnant women are at a much higher risk for all the negative and serious complications that come with the flu: ER visits, hospital admissions, intensive care stays, and even mortality. Simply stated: the flu and pregnant women do not mix.

Because of this oil-and-water situation, it is crucially important to receive the flu vaccine once it becomes available, no matter what trimester or “pre” trimester you’re in. The flu vaccine in pregnancy is at the top of every OB’s list, so it should be at the top of yours as well.

Additionally, research shows that the babies whose mothers received the flu vaccine while pregnant have a lower chance of developing the flu as an infant. The flu vaccine is not approved for use in babies younger than six months; therefore, the best way for these babies to receive protection is through their mothers (antibodies against the flu will pass from mom to baby through the placenta and protect the baby for up to six months of age). Simply stated, the best way to prevent and protect both you and your baby from being sidelined in a serious fashion from the flu is to receive the flu vaccine at the outset of the flu season.

The flu vaccine USED to come in two formulations, a shot and nasal mist.  The nasal mist was NOT safe in pregnancy (it was live weakened virus).  But the CDC pulled this version from circulation as it was not found to be effective.  So currently, all formulations are safe before, during, and after pregnancy.

There has also been some controversy on the use of thimerosal, a mercury containing preservative used in some vaccines, and autism.  There is no solid scientific data to support a link with thimerosal causing autism in children born to women who used these vaccines.  Thimerosal-free formulations of the flu vaccine do exist but the ACOG and CDC do not necessarily recommend pregnant women use only these formulations.

Bottom line: if you are not getting the vaccine from your OB/GYN, make sure to share your big baby news with the healthcare provider who will be administering the vaccine.

Getting the flu while pregnant is no joke. While it’s totally normal to be extra cautious about what you eat, take, or do while pregnant, the flu vaccine gets the double thumbs up.